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CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 1:15am EST
brought the brits there during the previous century. and the absence of american empower washington had to iranians. the same two the united states military stuck around to help train. >>host: first, was there any resentment on the countries where they talk about to damage their affairs or monitor hours? was there a resentment? >> that is a complicated question. in a period of 1968 and the british manage their withdrawal, many arab emirates announced they were happy to see the british leave. and did a guy is of the persian gulf they profess they did not want the united states to replace them. in private the era of small emirates along the coast were petrified. 150 years they had enjoyed a certain degree of british protection and those and their leaders made offers to both london and washington to offer financial incentives for the british and americans to stay. they were afraid of the giant neighbor to the north north, i ran that since world war ii had been attempting to reassert the influence that they had enjoyed in previous centuries and fearful of their own neighbors. many arab stat
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 1:00am EST
about the white house and the potomac river. why is that? >> they think of washington d.c. are the national monument why do they think of of potomac river? >> for those in the area is seen as an obstacle as they drive over or under it i wanted to stress we have an incredible natural resource there are very few levies we have bald eagles it is not solely clean but we work on that and by the way we get 90% of the drinking water comes out of the river. >> talk about the historical significance can you give us examples? >> mount vernon that washington known to because if you live there you got to pick the site of the nation's capital. now vernon is the most significant building on the potomac historic way. >> in your research i'm guessing you spent time on the river? >> i went to several hundred to visit to combine history with recreation. i hit all the sites people could go to but also take a hike or a jump in a canoe to have a good time. it is an enormous recreation opportunity for people visiting the area. >> thank you so much. >> by the way i have a sequel coming out for february 2
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 3:30pm EST
creek. the circle in washington depicts sheraton of the touring war house. in the act of realing his army at -- and no command the new army of the shenandoah. sheraton's size contributed to the impression of youth that he projected. he was just 5'5", and only 115 pounds in 1864. but it's grant memorable replied to one officer who commented on sheraton diminutive statute, i think you'll find him plenty big enough for the job. just before sheraton's appointment, confederate general and 14,000 troops had marched down the shenandoah valley across the plateau mick to washington. it was a shock. capital was thrown to a panic. grant rushed troops to the city from his army outside peter berg and early withdrawal. they merged four military department with the new one with sheraton in charge of it. he was ordered to pursue army to the death and to destroy the shenandoah valley grain, produce, and livestock. on september 19, he attacked the army and defeated it at the third battle of winchester. three days later, sheraton's army followed up with the soaked victory at fisher's hill. after the tw
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 8:00am EST
to washington as the nation's candidate for u.s. senate, goes to washington, already six feet tall, at the front of the line when they go to the white house and kennedy finishes his speech, bill clinton looks forward and gets his picture taken a long side of john f. kennedy. he is so proud and he already is dedicated to the idea that he is going to be the person who is going to bring complete honor to the family. by the age of 17 he is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas and governor of arkansas and president of the united states. this is something which everyone who knows him knows about. he talks about it all the time. he does not go to the university of arkansas. egos to georgetown. from georgetown he becomes the arkansas candidate for rhodes scholarship and goes to oxford. he is an incredible success everywhere but he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he is attracted to the kind of women his mother direct him to who are the beauty queens, the ones who are flirtatious, who are attractive and that is where his i has been. until he goes bac
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 6:45pm EST
book was on george washington and slavery, entitled, an imperfect guide, which was published in 2003. at the end of his talk, he will be taking questions and we be available to sign copies of this book in the gallery. please join me in welcoming, henry wiencek. [applause] >> thank you, andrew. i very much appreciate your remarks in his homecoming for me because i spent many months upstairs and down the hall when i had a fellowship here to begin my research on the boat. i'm extremely grateful to andrew for all the aid he has lent me in support and also to dian jordan from a former executive at her and leslie bowman, current executive dirt for their support in the past into the present. this is a magnificent resource in the standard set of monticello is perhaps the leading public history study of slavery in the united states. the study of that subject is really very difficult for a number of reasons. one is that it's so hard to get the documents in the other is a psychological impediments that we americans have that best described by the theologian who also happens to be the fathe
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 12:45pm EST
george washington and slavery entitled "an imperfect god" which was published in 2003. at the end of his talk, he will be taking questions, and will be available to sign copies of his book in the gallery. employees join me in welcoming henry weincek. [applause] thank you. i appreciate your remarks, it's a home coming for me. i spent many months downstairs and down the hall when had a fellowship to begin my research on the book. and i'm extremely grateful to personally for all the aid he lent know support over the years and also to the former executive directer of month cello and the current executive directer for their support in the past and present. this is a great resource and as andrew says month cello is the leading -- the study of the subject is really very difficult for a number of republicans. it's hard to get out the documents. and the other is the psychology immedment that the americans have and as described by the though lodge began who happens to be the father of my editor, he says american americans by ultra additions are the most innocent people on earth. you never do anyth
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2012 12:00pm EST
washington, very successful about turning around inner city kids, and the kids in that school have to carry a book at all times. it's neat. funny you mention that. i did a reading at my home town, and my 2nd grade teacher was there. she's like 92 years old. i was signing books, and she said, james, your handwriting is still atrocious. [laughter] >> that's great. talk a little bit about where you see our culture going. you're doing -- >> oh, my god. >> i don't mean in general, but in terms of reading. are we creating a culture of readers, notary -- non-readers, where are we now? >> i think the worst thing that's happening is we're creating a culture where people don't listen. they don't listen to the other side. there's a quote -- i read an editorial in the "new york times" a couple weeks ago, and it had to do with morality's ability to behind -- bind and blind, and, you know, it binds people, you believe in, you know, you believe in whatever you believe in, abortion one way or the other or whatever you believe about entitlements or whatever you believe about global warming, but you're
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 9:00am EST
washington as their delegate to congress. brigham young was, to put it mildly, not very happy with either babbitt or the federal appointees. he did not want nonmormons to interfere with the church's control of utah's politics. also he had heard all sorts of negative reports about babbitt's activities in washington. babbitt had drunk too much, he had cozied up to politicians hoping to get a territorial appointment for himself, all sorts of things. shortly after babbitt's return to utah, young summoned him to his office at 8:00 in the morning. young rarely started the day so early. he liked to go to bed late and get up late, and i think because of that he may have been in an especially cantankerous mood for the meeting. babbitt began by reporting that president fillmore hoped that you would not mingle your religion with your politics. the president worried that young would be as a prince of this world and a prophet for the next. babbitt and young then argued over a few things; federal appropriations for the territory. babbitt had bought, had brought 20,000 or so dollars to utah for t
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2012 9:15am EST
campaign. the terms by which washington assisted the finance and auto industries have been the focus of intense debate but the most contentious example of all is the one on which diana furchtgott-roth, senior fellow and speaker this afternoon focuses in her timely and important new book "regulating to disaster: how green jobs policies are damaging america's economy". in it, she subjects assumptions and policies which led to such ill-fated federal investments as that of the now bankrupt solyndra solar panel manufacturer as well as the a 123 caller battery manufacturer to a withering analysis which we at the institute have come to expect of the oxford trained economist whose chief of staff for the council of economic advisers. sorry. during the administration of president george w. bush. in her book she helps us understand why the failures of such direct investments in private firms are both significant problems in themselves and cautionary tale for those who would have the government rather than private investors allocate capital. the publication of "regulating to disaster" calfs diana's
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2012 7:30am EST
american legion. gets nominated to go to washington as the quote unquote boys, nation candidate for u.s. senate. goes to washington, he's already six feet tall. he strives to the front of the line when they go to the white house to see president kennedy. and then when kennedy finishes his speech, bill clinton votes forward and get his picture taken with, alongside of john f. kennedy. is so proud. he is so proud. and he is already dedicated to the idea that he is going to be the person who is going to bring complete honor to the family. it already, by the age of 17, is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas, then governor of arkansas, and president of the united states. this is something which everyone who knows him knows about. he talks about it all the time. it is not go to the university of arkansas, he goes to georgetown. and from georgetown he becomes the arkansas candidate for the rhodes scholarship and goes to oxford. he is an incredible success everywhere, but he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he is attracted to the kind of women his m
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 9:45pm EST
arthur's behalf in criminal trial, but now she goes and starts recruiting in high society washington and she was a very prominent woman with many prominent friend come easy access to the leadership of the country. shoe into the is user good hospices until a until he should part with arthur. his mother is very good. the execution is worse than the crime she couldn't contemplate arthur would be executed. he and jackson were on lives of the clock keeps ticking. >> otb cytometry and four to discuss his book, "the coming prosperity." or fessler are spoiled was in attendance at the book festival held at the annually. >> joining us at george mason gears professor philip auerswald, his most recent book is this, shrink three. here's the cover of the book. what role does fear play in development? >> well, that's a great question. they don't talk about what role does fear play in our conversation about development, so when we talk about our reality to share our ideas in the marketplace can we compete with other atheists only know three things about marketplace ideas. short-term sells better tha
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 11:00pm EST
washington assisted the auto industries have been intense debate but the most contentious example it is one of that diana our speaker this afternoon focus it is on her timely book "regulating to disaster". she subjects the assumptions and policies that late bled to ill-fated when assessments like solyndra and a123 battery car manufacturer that we have come to expect from this former chief of staff for the council of economic advisers during the administration of president george w. bush. she helps us understand while the failures of private firms have significant problems themselves and cautionary tales to have the government rather than private investors allocate capital. the publication of regulating to disaster caps her first year as a senior fellow in which she has been prolific and influential cited by a writers, reporters and talk show host across the country. to think of her many contributions ranging from her analysis demonstrating even adjusting for the state of the economy those receiving food stamps it is that an all-time high. to another that we'll companies are not monopoly
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 2:30pm EST
up the issues. again this going to tell a story. before i do that, because i am from washington and because it's halloween and because i have three children, all of some of the church retreat to my will report year that the most popular cost and that is completely is binder full of women. >> what did the selling custom look like? you put your arms in the binder. it's like not at jack in the box . pops out of a little fuller think. said we were bell in washington. very creative. i'm just going to tell the story that inspired me to read my book. this began in 2009. the book is based on an atlanta store which cannot in 2010. basically i have been vacationing for a long time which is a pretty prosperous working class town. when you went there. it seemed like it or not that many men around. it seemed like a was not seen them in church, at the fairgrounds, driving down the street, trucks, during construction. this is the height of the housing collapse that anyone talked about. and so men were having a lot of hard time. the loss of a lot of manufacturing jobs. and i really became curious a
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 5:15pm EST
2013. >> from the 12th annual national book festival on the national mall in washington, d.c., bob woodward presents his book, "the price of politics." this is about 45 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. thanks.k it's great to be here. i'm going to put myself on the clock so i don't talk too long,h and then we have lots of time for questions. and then we have lots of times the questions. and i want to begin by recounting something that occurred about five or six years ago my wife and i were at an aging conference and how to deal with aging. how many people are interested in the subject of aging? raise your hand. okay, you all are. i tell you. at age 69, i am deeply interested in the subject of aging. and they have psychiatrists and physicians and so forth on this panel. james watson, who was the codiscoverer of dna, the nobel prize winner was also on the panel. we had the discussion and it went on for an hour, and watson said nothing. that is the end of zero comments. now, you know the power of silence was just overwhelming, and so finally, the moderator, charlie rose asked him, doc
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 12:00am EST
he goes to washington and he tsra six feet tall. he strives the front of the line when they go to the white house to see president kennedy and when kennedy finishes his speech bill clinton goes forward and gets his picture taken alongside at of kennedy. he is so proud, he is so proud and he is already dedicated to the idea that he is going to be the person who will bring complete honor to the family. prd by the age of 17 is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas and governor of arkansas and then president of the united states. this is something which everyone you knows him knows about because he talks about it all the time. he goes to georgetown and from georgetown he becomes a candidate for a rhodes fellowship and goes to -- he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he is attracted to the kind of women his mother directs him to gore the beauty queens, who are the ones who are flirtatious and who are attractive and that is really where his eyes had been. and tell the goes to yale law school. there he meets hillary rodham. >> you can watch this and
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 6:00pm EST
which reflect the subtitle congress in the washington correspondents and it's amazing that is also the is an area where don has developed his knowledge and his way of thinking about congress and the strict application of oral history and to put it in the perspective which through his books survived. one of the purposes of the talks actually is to demonstrate how resources of libraries and in particular the library of congress are used by scholars to point out all of the effort that we going to in kettering the collections when the working of the historians and library hands for the public sometimes has a pay off in a real book and a book that will live and be shared by many and that of course is what will happen to not only done's books but also to the experience of fdr and the election of 1930 to which we are interpreting and reinterpreting, and we have a wonderful speaker to help us with this. associate historian of the year donald ritchie. don? [applause] >> we have a great crowd here today. very thankful you all can now. surprising because here we are in the middle of a huge presid
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 2:30pm EST
columbia with marriage equality, we have three more states, maryland, maine and washington state who will actually vote on marriage equality at the ballot box in early november. if that happens it will be the first time there is equality is achieved at the ballot box without a lawsuit, without legislation and so on and we have one state, minnesota, which i think of as being pretty liberal. al franken is there senator, they will be voting on whether or not to add a constitutional amendment defining marriage as between one man and one woman. so it is a big year for this and we also will appear in a week or two which cases the supreme court will take up. there is coal proposition 8 case coming out of california, and the ninth circuit, and right out of boston here, fantastic work -- 1 a glad, gay lesbian advocates and defenders, they are bringing the most effective cases against the so-called defense of marriage act and we will find out whether the supreme court will take up one or more or all of those cases and then we will have -- we should have a ruling by next june. so it is a big moment
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 11:30pm EST
george washington to james monroe. of course, that included john adams and jefferson and madison. of slavery the founding fathers of the complicated legacy and we did never wanted to believe. the crisis he did write private letters to a few southerners and then he was added to talk about slavery and right and wrong a. this is not new language four lincoln. he told a former law partner the slavery question cannot be compromised. that was a logical statement from a man that lincoln compared slavery in freedom of two beasts held apart. those antagonist break the bonds then the question will be settled. steven douglas the great democrat from illinois what he saw as the view of slavery he said douglas don't care but god cares and humanity cares proprietary. to his past lincoln describes evil over all national deals and dangers have come. it must be stopped. to accept a compromise that there would even permit the theory of expansion expansion -- lincoln. he never advocated any moves timing begin he declared the federal government does us no such power. even supported the one measure aimed
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 3:00pm EDT
until 1868, congress in washington and much of the south had been battlefield of a different kind.rent congress was roaring against the executives. they wanted to impeach andrewti. johnson. another question is who will govern us out. with the republican regime that was imposed upon us out the south by union troops -- with a govern? or would the pre-majority? to the surprise of many south? southerners, grant became something of a sympathetic figure.sympat he washe the good union general and one who granted generous surrenders terms to generaled lease troops they had to get back to the south, which was starving as a result of the war. in no small part because of grant's strategy. the south was starving. he began treating them as fellow americans. when his own troops began toroop cheer upon the surrender, he told them to be quiet. he said these are our countrymen. m he became the sympathetic general.e unti sherman became the devil incarnate until the end of his day. you have another question?ng >> but i'm trying to insert myself in a conversation. [laughter] but i would really l
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 10:15am EST
? how do you do senate -- do that? a it's a slippery slope. i i was on washington journal a month ago and i was asked this question, and if we go in, or if we militarily either more aggressive support in terms of the military aid or boots on the ground, air toast support, what's hezbollah going to do sunset what's iran going to do? what's russia going to do? this is quite volatile and i don't think we have thought out all of the potential possibilities of getting involved in another quagmire in the middle east. and as i said, i have lots of friends there if there was an easy answer to this, if military intervention -- if there was any chance where there was limited damage, collateral damage to our buys -- i use at brook army medical center i used to volunteer in the burn center, the boys coming back from afghan afghanistan and iraq and hit by ied asks other explosions and we have to think of these things before we blindly go in or semi blindly go in, and when i got back home, i received a bunch of e-mails from some generals, colonels, military people, and they were so thankful. th
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 5:30pm EST
volunteering? >> guest: i was an editor and i was an editor in washington dc and i am still doing the same job. >> host: how did you get all that time off? could use your vacation time. >> guest: yes, i use my vacation time. the problem is you are working the whole time, so you get back and think you need a vacation, but it is a great way to do itxp on your own schedule.xp8xxrxr8pp most of these chips are tax-deductible, which is nice as well. >> host: is voluntouring addictive? >> guest: it is. i would get home and think a while, once you step back, this was a very intense experience. it's very good.xpxpxxxzxrxxxpxr you sexze places in a differentr way.xp you are eating with locals andxp working with locals, they learnz about you when you learnxz about them postmarked in new orleans, who did you hook up with? how did you get to be a volunteer? is there an office? >> guest: my job. they were working for rebuilding together. it said they were looking for volunteers and i took it. rebuilding together is still working together. when i was back in new orleans in may, i saw the places
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 1:20pm EST
after george????? washington became president.?? it has the major features and a? major mission features of the? centralized intelligence.???? the os us was very unique because it? was the first?? national intelligence service responsible to one command, and that is the president's. before that, before the zero ss was created, they had always been departmentalized. highly technical. you have the u.s. army, u.s. navy, the state department, the fbi, treasury, commerce. every major agency of the u.s. government had its own intelligence service of the specialized nature. so it was created to nationalize or centralized that intelligence existence, which is something that the model after the british . which is also very controversial nature because people always blame to pro-british. so it was a very interesting experience because of world war ii, the prime opportunity for the proponent of a centralized intelligence to prove its worth. and that is why the experience? was fascinating, and generally a lot of arguments for the eventual purpose of providing legal justification of
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 7:15am EST
washington as the boys nation, candidate for u.s. senate. goes to washington. is already six feet tall. he strives to the front of the line when they go to the white house to see president kennedy. and then when kennedy finishes his speech, bill clinton both forward and get his picture taken with, alongside a john f. kennedy. you so proud. he already is dedicated to the idea that he's going to be the person who's going to bring complete honor to his family. he already by the age of 17 has planned to be elected attorney general of arkansas, then governor of arkansas and as president of the united states. this is something which everyone knows him knows about because he talks about it all the time. he does not go to the university of arkansas. he goes to georgetown. from georgetown he becomes the arkansas candidate and goes to oxford. he is an incredibly success everywhere but he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he is attracted to the kind of women, his mother direction to what the beauty queens, who are the ones flirtatious, who are attractive, and that's reall
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 8:00am EDT
story about strom thurmond begins in late july 1992. i'm on a flight from washington d.c. to charlotte, north carolina. i had been an intern that summer up on capitol hill. one of my regrets that this summer was i'd never seen strom thurmond because all of my fellow interns said you've got to see strom thurmond. he is such an unusual appearance about him. i didn't know what they meant, but i have my suspicions. so i'm on the flight and i look in front of me and cnn who has got these kind of orange colored hair comes so brightly covered and first-generation kind of hair plugs. it shows you how slow i am. i think to myself, and that must be what strom thurmond's head looks like. and of course it wasn't strom thurmond. i realize that when people were reaching over and tried to shake his hand. i wanted to shake his hand because i've been in d.c. that summer for the first time and i've met all these politicians had seen on tv. it had a great thrill. i got to go home and speech made as rotary club and i wanted to tell them about all the famous people at hennepin washington d.c. i was going t
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 8:00pm EDT
washington post." no. i report for the number one english-language newspaper, the guardian, greatest last story about romney billionaires covered the entire front page of the newspaper and by last story about mr. romney and his billionaires was at the top of the nightly news for bbc television where i'm an investigative reporter. now i know that in case you don't know what investigative reporting is, it's not done here because it's a violation of the patriot act three which is why you haven't seen me on any of the local, the peacock or the foxhole or the eyewall, or even "msnbc" but some of you got that. mr. romney and his money. that is all right as governor romney himself would say. in america we like to celebrate success, and his success is nothing compared to his partners. three billionaires who operate hedge funds, partnered with romney on a takedown of the treasury in the auto bailout. three guys earned $4.2 billion from the u.s. treasury. you remember that from the debate, right? no one asks, no one is answering that begin today, we got the confirmation from the romney campaign. no
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 11:00pm EST
the regulators and said we have flown to washington i give quarterly briefings you need to be in this community. just to know what is possible. it is not my job to regulate or enforce but to help the regulators do their job better. we feel our responsibility is to bring those entities into the process to allow them to see what is possible we have a deal. here is my drawn idea. -- drone idea. to say that is sketchy we will call our friends at the fbi. we told them we would call the fbi. that is our responsibility. >> host: what about the three laws of robotics? >> but it turns out for the robot to be smart enough and they have already taken over the world. [laughter] it is very hard. cognition, artificial intelligence, shoot a gun and is easy. that is not the way it will have been. if you have the robots to make ethical choices, we just need to watch to evolves regulatory and surveillance abilities to spot it early. >> host: go back to synthetic biology with questions to worry about hobbyist doing a killer virus? the doctor email laing dm day. and a just and just this? >> i did talk at
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2012 8:00am EST
, and this was told to me by the deputy ambassador of the european union in washington. i'm not making this up. so the conflict. between self-governing regime and global governance is going to be with us for a while. it's going -- i'd say it's perennial really, may be with us long after the 20th century has left. because it concerns the oldest issues of politics, going back to plato and aristotle, the questions of who governs and what regime. in my book i have a chapter discussing some of the history of the global governance strug and what the american founders' views were as they looked back to this, and they had a definite opinion. they were emphatically on the side of independent sovereignty and against transnational governance. they favored david other goliath, the ancient israelites over their imperial foes, cato over caesar, the roman republic over the roman empire, the english republican, algernon sydney, over the british kings. the british parliament over the british monarch and ultimately, of course, american self-governance over autocratic power abroad as the late will mayor
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 12:00pm EST
a flight from washington dc to charlotte, north carolina. and i have been an intern that summer on capitol hill. one of my regrets of the summer was that i had never seen strom thurmond. all my intern said, you have to see strom thurmond. he is such an unusual character and has such an unusual appearance about him. i didn't know what they meant, but i have my suspicions. so i look ahead in front of me and i see a man who has these orange colored hairstyles. and i think to myself, that must be what strom thurmond's head looks like. of course, it wasn't strom thurmond. i knew that with people reaching over and trying to shake my hand and that kind of thing. i wanted to shake his hand, too, because i had been in washington dc for the first time and met all of these politicians that i saw on tv and there had been a great thrill. i got to go home and speak to my dads rotary club and i wanted to tell them about all of the famous people that i met in washington dc. so when i got off the plane, there were people already lined up. already lined up to shake his hand. i didn't get in line. an
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 11:00pm EST
millionth book distributed we started 20 years ago at martha's table in washington d.c.. we have distributed more and more as years have gone by because we have started newer models. especially in recent years we have distributed probably 10 million or 11 million a year. we support programs across the united states and now over 40,000. our funding comes from a lots of it comes from corporate marketing campaigns that we do as well as individual donors and some foundations. we also created a generating model which is -- [inaudible] >> ms. robinson, is there a special focus for first book? you can do the preschoolers or do you work with the classrooms are what? >> is a great question. first book has built a pipeline of support for all programs serving kids in need, all classrooms serving kids in need and reading is fundamentally a good example. we have over 1900 fundamental programs supported by first book as well as over 40,000 others. so head start, after-school programs, mentoring, kid zero to 18 are supported by first books. >> jane robinson mentioned reading is fundamental and
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 4:30pm EST
talent with you find a way to brush this aside much the way george washington brushed aside his own complaining subordinates in the revolution. while at key moments he put his foot down and essentially told the births to stuff it. that didn't stop field marshal bernard akamai from becoming a thorn in the sight of all american commanders in europe for the duration of the war. but i.e., omar bradley, george patton all mannish workarounds to minimize negative impacts of the war effort. so when the war ends, we're expected to supply wealth and prosperity to all be due to the best of our ability to get this brings with it this irony that by supplying wells and protection, you are eroding the very disciplines necessary to maintain and perpetuate prosperity for yourself and prosperity and freedom for others. that will be the challenge of the next 75 years on the topic of volume two. to provide canopy of liberty and perpetuate american exceptionalism while allowing just enough of the reign of difficulty and disappointment to remind americans and the world that the error which we don't than
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 7:00pm EST
case, washington state university, a student wrote a play in the passion of the musical with of the stated goal of attending offending everybody. they put it on the ticket, they put it everywhere. do not come if you are offended. and the african-american student had the absolute goal of defending everybody and made a point of putting it out there. the university worked with students the pingree, and again it is a musical comedy. they bought the students tickets and told them to stand up in the middle of the plate and shout i am offended which is ironic because that was the point of the play. [laughter] but it got worse than that. it turned into students, you know, shouting death threats. it's predictable if you send the mall to the play and it's going to go a little badly. the university president of chollet defended the next day. the students that disrupted the play saying this is a very responsible exercise of freedom of speech on the part of the angry mob of the students come and just absolutely stunning that they've gotten that block by block and the censorship knows better than
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 4:00am EST
remember the first time in washington while he was collecting. as you might imagine, i was extremely anxious about introducing myself. and for all the puppet pugilistic posturing that he is infamous for, he was, in fact, this alarmingly sweet, polite, generous, quick to laugh and never made a young man and publishing feel that he had to impress them in any way. he was much less interested in what somebody new that have they thought. definitely interested in whether not i could make him laugh. and he was just a very palm and appreciative writer. i have been lucky to work with some fantastic people. there is no single writer or person i have worked with in publishing and made the impression on me that christopher did. i can just say, on behalf of 12, this is absolutely the most personal book we ever published. an incredibly proud to be affiliated with it. >> mannered. beautiful manners. it was a reminder that in manners begins morality. it's not nothing, manners. it's not a layer. the beginning of actually empathetic feeling. three democratic. he talked to the person you talk to. -- as
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 11:00pm EST
become an advocate and if you have friends in maine or maryland or washington state or minnesota and you've been meaning to have a conversation with them this would be a good time to call them. because every vote is going to count and every time we've ran in one of these places, the appearance and the reality are an unrelenting forward movement has created so each of the battleground states are really important. i hope you will feel empowered by the polk and find new words. thank you for coming out tonight. [applause] >> thank you. so, what do you want to talk about? who has a question? >> okay. a great pity the was wonderful -- [laughter] there's one. there comes the microphone. >> it's a little intimidating, isn't it? [laughter] >> i was at the constitutional conventions here and i remembered at the time we were singing the same song over and over again that this seemed the way people were trying to abrogate the fear of the population was by creating a sense of separation between the religious sense of marriage and the more secular sense. i'm wondering if you and your book addresse
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 12:45am EST
. we've actually flown to washington, given briefings, and they say you guys may be in this community and you need to know what's possible. because it's not my job to regulate. it's not my job to enforce it. it's my job to help them do their job better. we feel that our responsibility is to bring those entities that we trust in protecting our safety and bring them into the process and allow them to see what is possible. by the way, we have a deal. if you say something in the community, he said this is my idea and it might be a little dangerous, and we say, that sounds a little sketchy. we told everybody that we are going to do it. and we feel that that is our responsibility. let the pros do their job. >> do you think it's time for robotics? >> the problem is that everybody thinks this up and it turns out that robots have already taken over the world. it's really hard, its artificial intelligence and all this kind of stuff. but that's not the way it's going to happen. we can't imbue our robots with the intelligence of ethical choices. we need to watch what is going on. and evolve our r
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 12:00pm EST
washington post which rarely had much positive to say admitted he had threaded her way among potential sources of trouble with skill. epitomizing the simple human response required by the tragedy the editorial continued she exceeded in communicating to the peeve began she met a desire to help. and do so with a great task for which she deserved much credit. if the trip to peru shows a potential for her to serve as good will pass. ambassador the trip to africa the following year showed her determination. in early january, 1972, pat set out on an eight-day 10-,000 mile trip to the african continent. she visited many places. the primary mission of the trip was to participate in the inauguration of william. the new president of liberia. for the first time, the first lady would be the official representative of the united states. as such, patted met privately with the president there as well as prime minister and the president edward of ghana and president felix -- [inaudible] sorry. the ivory coast. i think i murdered their names. i apologize. her official party of forty include t
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 10:00pm EST
interesting experience of talking about the book at the community college not far from washington. it is extraordinary how much people don't know. you know, just by virtue much being young. how did they know. they didn't grow up with participates that fought in world war ii. my uncle was thinking about whether he had drafted and he had low draft number. then i thought they don't know what i'm talking about. it means. draft doesn't really mean much of anything anymore either. it's interesting, it really is. >> [inaudible] s a fascinated to think about in terms of what is war. we've had war for ten years now, and we had another war and they had war, but this war no one is really participating in except certain percentage. >> it's changed hasn't it. yes. >> and it's not an obligation of citizenship anymore to fight for your country. it's something that the professional military does. i think that's a pretty profound change that's taking place. because of that richard nixon. and also because of my generation didn't want to put an end -- wanted to put an end to the draft. it's interesting
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 3:45pm EST
these first four words. so, i'll quote. i it was so disturbing so washington, i had to put the book down. addressed to a woman i can only assume is grunwalds wife, it reads to christina, my stimulus. this twit was trashing my dedication page. and i don't think the terrorists who are trying to kill salomon rushdie ever trashed his dedication page. so washington, said this kid who lives in washington. i woman i can only assume is grunwalds wife. i can only assume you're single, dude. he says, if christina really is his stimulus, does that mean she kept him from collapsing into an unprecedented depression? if we accept the definition of stimulus as something that rouses or incites to activity, the note comes across as a strangely explicit display of wonky ribaldry. come visit us in south beach, kid. we'll show you something. my stimulus is here tonight -- wait, where -- there she is, and christina did prevent me from collapsing into a depression. anybody who has ever written a book can empathize with. she most definitely rouses to activity. and it's like, change that diaper. and, yeah,
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 9:30am EST
without cedar creek. a statue in sheridan circle in washington depicts sheridan on his towering warhorse in the act of rowling his army at cedar creek. green with age, a statute conveys sheridan's electric energy. lincoln and more secretary ever stand had thought of the 33 year-old sheridan too young when grant proposed in july 1864 that he command the new army of the shenandoah. sheridan's size contributed to the impression of youth that he projected. he was just 5'5" and only 115 pounds in 1864. but as grant memorably replied to one officer commented on sheridan's diminutive stature, i think you'll find him plenty big enough for the job. just before sheridan's appointment, confederate general early and 14,000 troops have marched down the shenandoah valley, across the potomac at threatened washington, the tremendous shock, the capital was thrown into a panic, grant rushed troops to the city from his army outside petersburg, and early withdrew. to prevent a recurrence, the lincoln administration merged for military departments into a new one, with sheridan in charge of it. he was ordered
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 7:00pm EST
and nationalp intelligence counsel inac washington for about thirty fivl years.in >> what capacity? >> i became the national intelligence officer for latinee america which it a three or foua star military equivalent.on he was a civilian. it was a substantial position. i had responsibility for all of latin america and cuba. on the an lettic side oft -- intelligence. >> what does thatno mean? >> i was not a field operative. i did not go and conductof espionage. i did not go out and be foreignl agency. most of my career at headquarter mainly virginia. i wrote national intelligencean estimates. quite a few on cuba over the >> b years, and on many of the other ca latin american countries. how >> before we get to castro and the castro regime. at how did you get interested in the work? >> i was student at georgetownes university where i later taughte for about twenty five years as , an adjunct i'm teaching now atgo the university of miami. i was attracted to the foreigner service school at georgetown. it was a timeja when a lot of us of my generation were inspired h by jack kennedy's ask
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 7:15am EST
booktv.org. >> from the 12th annual national book festival on the national mall in washington, d.c., sally bedell smith presents her book, "elizabeth the queen: the life of a modern monarch." it's about 40 minutes. [applause] >> thank you so much, francis, if that generous introduction. i have to tell you that i'm especially honored to be introduced by francis today because our friendship goes back to the mid 1990s when my husband, stephen, was the founding editor of civilization, the wonderful magazine of the library of congress, and francis was his highly capable deputy editor. the magazine, unfortunately, fell victim to the first wave of infatuation with the internetedt and lost its funding, but francis has gone on to be a top editor at "the washington post.n as i've been traveling arounds the country talking about queenn elizabeth ii, the one consistent question that i have heard is what did you learn thati surprised you. at did you learn t surprised you. >> the answer is that there was something unexpected around almost every corner. in my research, i made numerous discoveries about t
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 8:00am EST
second term includes george washington, james madison, and rejection, theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, ronald reagan and bill clinton. lincoln is a special case and that his successful second term was so brief. it is interesting to note-only presidents who had a more successful second term than their first word james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the president's elected to a second term and the reason for those of experience failed or troubled second terms. four failed because of a war that seemed unwinnable war for lack of preparedness. jefferson, truman, johnson and. were the four. also four failed because of economic crisis or failure to act to deter such a crisis. jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt, the 37 downturn and george bush. eight who failed due to their inability to lead congress were jefferson, monroe, grant, wilson, truman, johnson, nixon and george bush. two failed due to who boris. franklin roosevelt and richard nixon. four who did not effectively communicate their agendas or initiatives were jefferson, monroe,
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 1:15pm EST
during the previous century. so, in the absence of american power, washington had to rely on two surrogates. the saudis and the iranians. those same two countries, after world war ii, of which the united states military stuck around to help train. >> host: well, first off, professor, was there any resentment on the part of some of the countries in the middle east where we talk about taking over for the english, to manage their affairs or to monitor our affairs in the middle east? was there resentment in the persian gulf area about that? >> that's a complicated question. i would think for public consumption, in the period 1968 to 1971 when the british were managing their withdrawal, many of the arab emirates publicly pronounced they were happy to see the british leave. and under the guise of the persian gulf for the local powers, they publicly profess they didn't want the united states to replace them. in private, on the other hand, the arab small emirates along the southern coast of the gulf war petrified. for 150 years they had enjoyed a certain degree of british protection, and
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 5:30pm EST
washington, and it is extraordinary how much people don't know. you know, just by virtue of being young. how would they know? they didn't grow up with parents who fought in world war ii. i explained how my uncle was thinking about whether he would be drafted ape had what we called a low draft number of the i thought, they don't know what i'm talking about. a low draft number -- draft doesn't mean much of anything anymore either. it's an interesting problem. it really is. >> i think it would be fascinating to think in terms of what is war? i mean, we've had war for ten years now, another war. they had war, but this war, no one's participated in other than certain percentage. it's out there. >> yeah. it's changed, hasn't it? >> yes, it has. >> and not -- it's not an obligation of citizenship anymore to fight for your country when it's at war. it's something that the professional military does. i think that's a profound change that's taken place. because of that richard nixon in 197 p 3, and, also, because of my generation, they wanted to put an end to the draft. >> [inaudible] >> oh
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 1:00pm EST
those discussions, talking to johnson, both in bangkok and in washington. but when they did start recruiting soldiers, the king made it clear that he supported the venture. he bid farewell, sponsored a lot of celebrations that marked the departure of these troops to south vietnam. he showed a direct personal interest in their well-being. visited the wounded seems in the hospital when they came back. he presided over funeral ceremonies for them at these. so from the very beginning thailand was involved. as for whether he would give his blessing had it gone forward, i don't know. it's hard to imagine without his support such a thing taking place. >> host: currently what kind of relationship does the u.s. military have with the thai military? >> guest: the united states still has a close relationship with the royal thai army. this hasn't changed since the vietnam war. we have regular annual exercises with the thais and other regional armies, but they hold them every year in thailand. and many of the thai officers trained in the united states and have contacts with the american counte
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 3:00pm EST
teleprompter, who understand how to manipulate the levers of power in washington. he understood human nature, understood the strength and weaknesses of the people in congress and how to play on those weaknesses and strengths. obama doesn't have that skill set to use human nature as a way of getting done what he wants to get done in washington. >> host: holm books have you written? >> guest: i think this is my 11th book. three novels and eight nonfiction. >> host: what do you say to critics of your books? >> guest: what do the critics say. >> host: the accuracy of the stories you tell, et cetera. >> guest: well, the fact of the matter is, as far as i know, there hasn't been a single fact in this book that's been challenged in a kind of credible way. people have said, oh, klein makes things up. that's what kids in the schoolyard -- they call each other names. i've been called all kinds of names. but in fact when it comes to the credibility of my reporting, i don't think anybody has laid a glove on me yet. >> host: how many university were you editor. >> guest: 12 years assed debtor in c
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 7:00pm EST
outside of washington, d.c., wayne karlin talking about his book wandering souls which is an account of the u.s. soldier return to vietnam to return a notbook he took from a soldier he killed during the north vietnam war. >>> joining us now on booktv is author and professor wayne karlin who most recent book is "wandering soul." professor karlin who was homer? >> he is a friend of mine who retired living in north carolina. he was a officer platoon leader in the vietnam war. and he had contacted me a number of years ago because i had some contacts in vietnam vietnamese i had been working with, he had taken a documents and a book from the body of an vietnamese soldier he killed during the war. and wanted to see if he could find a family and return those documents to this them. >> why. he had gone through decades of ptsd, not only because he killed that man, he had a rough war, he killed many people he had seen many of his own men killed, went through a lot of the pat earns that people tend to go through with post-traumatic stress, an adrenaline junkie. he wrecked card, he -- cars, had h
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 7:15am EST
washington and because it's halloween and because i have three children, all from love to trick or treat, i will report here that the most popular cautioned that has come up lately is binders full of women. [laughter] spent what does this hollow and caution look like? you put your arms in the binder, and it's like sort of nodded jack-in-the-box. it's like a jack lalanne in the box. who said we're dolan washington? i'm going to tell a story that inspired me to write my book. this began in 2000. the book is based on a story came out in 2010, and basically i had been vacationing and have a longtime which is a pretty process working class down come and one year i went there and it seemed like they were not that many minaret piercing like i was in a church, the fairgrounds, and driving down the street. this was at the height of the housing collapse that a needed talked about, and so many having a hard time. this was when we talk about the man session and he session. i really became curious about this. i read a novel, sort of half sci-fi, half depressing novel that same time in which the
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 2:00pm EST
philip gasoline in the washington d.c. area. just as the programs didn't work then and are not working now, they're unlike to work in the future. it's just that the government is not good at picking winning projects. the government wouldn't have thought of picking apple iphone five for example. that is expensive, but people wait in line because they want to buy one. it's not necessarily technology and expensive. is it just know what people want spend money and we don't know what it is. but there's other smart entrepreneurs and i'm sure many in the audience who have a better idea than the folks in washington. >> would you be in favor of a significantly higher gasoline tax to address the hidden social cost of pollution, what economists refer to as externalities? >> if i thought the castling were underpriced coming if they would be in favor of a carbon tax, not just gasoline, but that would affect energy. i don't believe energy is underpriced in the united states. there's many benefits of energy. is my job mobility. particular gasoline, people been able to drive on trips and get t
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